I swear we were infinite

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183,253 notes

stuckwith-harry:

frostedamericaniron:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

superwholock-is-my-design:

catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:


I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.
Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!
thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.
Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.
Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.
Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.
And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.
You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

This is why i get really upset when people tell me i am a deatheater when i say i am in slytherin

This makes me so happy. 

Slytherin Pride.

stuckwith-harry:

frostedamericaniron:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

superwholock-is-my-design:

catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:

I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.

Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!

thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.

Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.

Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.

Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.

And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.

You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

This is why i get really upset when people tell me i am a deatheater when i say i am in slytherin

This makes me so happy. 

Slytherin Pride.

(Source: zaynx, via spoopernatural-who-lock)

151,865 notes

manasaysay:

rabbrakha:

Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.

I started my period when I was 10 years old. But we didn’t tell my grandma for three years because she subscribed to the “old traditions”, where a woman on her period could not enter the house, not even to bathe. Where she had to sit outside in front of the house (where the whole village could be witness to her shame and isolation) for the entire duration.

My friend started her period unexpectedly while we were at our local temple (in America) for dance class. Asking around if any of the parents had pads (all of them apologized and acted like adults about it), I thought surely the front office has a first aid kit. Don’t they have pads? When we asked, not only did they not have any, when one of the women gave one from her purse, the head secretary told us “There are men who need to use the first-aid kit, ya? So we don’t keep period things there.” Not even ibuprofen (which has so many more uses than period pain).

There are girls in India and Nepal (and other places, but I just read an in-depth piece about the situations in Nepal) who have to go to the “period hut” when their period comes and not leave until its over. They can’t wash and dry their cloth pads in the daylight, so they do it at night when the pads won’t dry properly before their next use, making them vulnerable to infection.

It is incredibly important, especially in India, to break the taboo surrounding periods. Break the secrecy around an event that happens to almost every woman, every month for literally half of her lifetime. Break the hiding, break the cover-up, break the SHAME.

Just break EVERYTHING. So little girls can go to school every day of every month without feeling ashamed. So women can work every day of every month to provide for their families without being glared at. So single fathers can confidently take care of their daughters’ health. So that women can talk about how terrible their period is or isn’t and give each other advice on how to deal with it without looking around to make sure men aren’t listening.
So that Whisper doesn’t have to be called Whisper, it can be called SHOUT. It can be called PROUD. So that we don’t NEED to fucking WHISPER about our bodies and our health.

(Source: baawri, via bookkase)

210,660 notes

grimmzai:

lilmisshaps:

aquarius-kisses:

sirensandserenades:

dontevenseemyfriends:

pastichee:

greencarnations:

theomninerd:

breakmeofimpatience:

oh my…….

This is disgusting and these girls should be ashamed of themselves.

I mean really, who goes and does both Marvel and DC in the same photoshoot anyway? Terrible.

there shall be no mixing of the comics universes; it is an abomination

the bible says Stan and Lee not Stan Lee and DC.

Reblogging for the bible comment

i know i’m not the only one that thinks they are really hot

Ssshhhhh we’re doing that thing where we avoid the obvious

NO. BUT THE THIGHT MUSCLES ON FEMALE HULK COULD CRUSH MY SKULL,OKAY.

(Source: jonchinn, via swamamongthenorthernlights)